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Weapons

Weapons

Hydra 70 Launcher

Hydra 70 Launcher

The Hydra 70 rocket is a 2.75-inch (70 mm) diameter fin-stabilized unguided rocket used primarily in the air-to-ground role. The Hydra 70 Launcher was developed at Redstone Arsemal in Huntsville, Al.   The rocket can be equipped with a variety of warheads, and in more recent versions, guidance systems for point attacks.

Vietnam War Weapons

Vietnam War Weapons

The Vietnam Rifles in the Vietnam Display are the:  American M14 rifle, American M16 rifle , Russia AK47 rifle, Swedish Carl Gustav M45 submachine gun, Chinese Type 53 Carbine, American M79 grenade launcher, and Chinese Type 56 SKS Rifle

RPG-2 Grenade Launcher

RPG-2 Grenade Launcher

The RPG-2 is an early man portable, shoulder fired anti-tank rocket developed by the Soviet Union shortly after World War Two. The design was inspired by the German single-use Panzerfaust Anti-Tank Rocket and intended to be used against tanks and other armored vehicles.

American Weapons Display

American Weapons Display

Included in the American Weapons of World War Two Display are the Thompson submachine gun, the M1 Garand, an early extremely rare developmental model M1 Garand known as the "gas trap" Garand, the M1 carbine and it's paratroop version, the Springfield 1903 bolt action rifle and its sniper varient, the M1911 pistol, the M3 Grease Gun and the BAR Browning Automatic Rifle. 

Russian Weapons Display

Russian Weapons Display

The Russian Weapons display contains the classic small arms employed by Soviet armed forces during World War Two. Several gained iconic status and saw use well beyond WW2 in other conflicts. Contained in the display are the DP28 light machine gun, the Mosin Nagant M1891 Rifle, Tokarev M1940 SVT, the Mosin Nagant Carbine, the Mosin Nagant Revolver, the Tokarev 1933 Pistol, the PPSH-41 and PPS 43 submachine guns. 

60 mm M2 Mortar

60 mm M2 Mortar

The M2 60 mm Mortar is a principal weapon employed by the weapons platoon of an infantry company. The mortar is a high angle, smooth bore, muzzle loaded weapon which delivers plunging fire in an arc shaped trajectory. The M2 is lighter and more portable than the similar M1 81 mm mortar. 

Italian Weapons Display

Italian Weapons Display

The Italian Weapons of World War Two contain the Model 1938 Carcano rifle and its carbine version, the Beretta Model 1938 submachine gun, and the M1934 9MM pistol. 

British Weapons Display

British Weapons Display

The British Weapons of World War Two Display contains : the Bren Mark II Light Machine Gun, the Mark II STEN submachine gun, the Webley Mark IV .38 Revolver, the Inglis High Power Pistol, the No 2 Mark 1 Enfield Revolver, the Lee Enfield No 1 Mark III Rifle, the Lee Enfield No 4 Mark 1 Rifle, and the Lee Enfield No 5 Mark 1 Jungle Carbine. 

French Weapons Display

French Weapons Display

The French Weapons of World War Two Display contains the following: a MAS 1936 7.5 mm Rifle, the MAS 38 Submachine gun, the M1892 Ordinance 8 mm Revolver, and the Model 1935 A 7.65 mm Pistol. 

German Weapons Display

German Weapons Display

The German Weapons Display contains many small arms used by the German Military during World War Two. Included in the display are several well known German weapons including the 98K Rifle, the STG-44, the very successful MG42 Light Machine gun, the P08 Luger, MP40 machinepistol and the Walther PPK. There are also several lesser known weapons made in other countries by contract or aquired by occupation during the war.  

Japanese Weapons Display

Japanese Weapons Display

The Japanese Weapons of World War 2 display contains the follwoing: Type 38 Arisaka 6.5 mm rifle, Type 44 Arisaka 6.5 mm carbine, Type 2 7.7 mm paratroop rifle, Type 99 Arisaka 7.7 mm rifle, Type 89 mortar, Type 99 Nambu light 7.7 mm machine gun, Type 11 6.5 mm light  machine gun, Type 99 rifle, late war type 99 rifle, Model 14 Nambu 8mm pistol, and Type 1 Italian made rifle.

81 mm Mortar M1

81 mm Mortar M1

Mortars are very versatile and effective weapons and provide artillery firepower for infantry. Mortars can be carried into places not easy to transport large artillery pieces. They deliver plunging fire which can strike targets behind obstacles, fortifications and enemy positions on reverse slopes.  The M1 became the standard American battalion mortar in World War Two. The M1 is typically crewed by a team of seven men and saw service in the European and Pacific theaters of war.

 

MLE 1918 155MM Howitzer

MLE 1918 155MM Howitzer

MLE 1918 155mm Howitzer is the U.S. version of the French 1917 howitzer commonly referred to as a Schneider. This is the same type of gun that fired the last artillery round in World War I.

World War One Weapons Right Display

World War One Weapons Right Display

The World War Weapons right side Display contains many common small arms used by the United States. Some particularly well known items are the Springfield .30 caliber Carbine, the British 1917 Lee Enfield Rifle, and the Colt Model 1911 Semi-auto Pistol. 

World War One Weapons Left Display

World War One Weapons Left Display

The World War 1 Weapons left side Display contains many common small arms used by various military organizations during World War 1. Weapons used by France, Germany, Italy Russia, and the United States are included in the display. Some particularly well known items are the Spandau Machine Gun, the Erfurt Luger Pistol, the Mosin Nagant M1891 Rifle, the Springfield .30 caliber Carbine, the British 1917 Lee Enfield Rifle, and the Colt Model 1911 Semi-auto Pistol. 

Post-Civil War to 1900 Weapons

Post-Civil War to 1900 Weapons

The .45 caliber trapdoor rifle would remain in use with the Regular Army until 1894 and with the National Guard in various states until at least 1905.   The .45 caliber Model 1884 carbine was replace in 1896 with a .30 caliber carbine version of the Krag-Jorgensen, although the trapdoor would continue to be used by the National Guard into the early part of the 20th century. The Model 1896 Krag-Jorgensen carbine was used by the cavalry of the Regular Army and the majority of Volunteer cavalry units during the Spanish-American War.

Parrot Riffle

Parrot Riffle

One of the most accurate artillery pieces in the Civil War was the Parrot Rifle. A former Army captain and West Point graduate named Robert Parker Parrott patented the process that allowed the production of this rifle in 1861.

Civil War Breech Loading Rifle and Carbines

Civil War Breech Loading Rifle and Carbines

The difference between a Rifle and Carbine is the length of the barrel. The longer the barrel the greater was the accuracy. The Civil War is called the "first modern war" for many reasons; one of these reasons is because of breech-loading rifles.  Breech-loading rifles loaded their bullets at the back of the gun.   Using a breech-loading gun, ammunition could be loaded much faster and shots could be fired at the enemy much quicker. In addition, these rifles could have multiple bullets loaded into them at one time .

 

Civil War Smooth-bore and Rifle Muskets

 Civil War Smooth-bore and Rifle Muskets

Smooth bore Muskets came in various bore diameters from .69 calibers to the British Brown Bess  at .75 calibers.  A round ball fired from a smooth barrel is fairly unstable and just not very accurate. Hitting a target over 50 or so yards becomes as much a matter of luck as skill.  The Rifle Musket  which was loaded at the front of the gun barrel.  Rifling the barrel of a musket and using a hollow-based conical bullet that expands when the bullet is fired causes the bullet to spin and greatly increases accuracy upto 300-400 yards.

Civil War Fighting Tactics

Civil War Fighting Tactics

Smooth bore Muskets of the 1700’s Came in various bore diameters, from the French Charleville and early US military muskets at .69 calibers, to the British Brown Bess of nominal .75 calibers. The smooth-bore musket is accurate to maybe 50 yards when aimed. A round ball fired from a smooth barrel is fairly unstable and just not very accurate. Hitting a target over 50 or so yards becomes as much a matter of luck as skill.  

 

Pre-Civil War Weapons

Pre-Civil War Weapons

Flintlock muskets were the mainstay of European armies between 1660 and 1840.  A musket was a muzzle-loading smoothbore long gun that was loaded with a round lead ball  or a mixture of ball with several large shot (called buck and ball), and had an effective range of about 120 to 130 yards.  The beginning of the Mexican War coincided with a shift in the from the flintlock firing system to the much more reliable percussion cap ignition system.  Flintlock muskets were temperamental weapons and often failed to discharge

U.S. Veterans Memorial Museum
2060A Airport Road • Huntsville AL 35801
(256) 883-3737
info@memorialmuseum.org